Journal of Global Infectious Diseases

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2010  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 216--220

Retrospective analysis of suspected rabies cases reported at Bugando Referral Hospital, Mwanza, Tanzania


Humphrey D Mazigo1, Fredros O Okumu2, Eliningaya J Kweka3, Ladslaus L Mnyone4 
1 Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology, Weill-Bugando University of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza, Tanzania
2 Biomedical and Environmental Group, Ifakara Health Institute, P.O. Box 53, Ifakara, Tanzania
3 Division of Livestock and Human Disease Vector Control, Mosquito Section, Tropical Pesticide Research Institute, Box 3024, Arusha, Tanzania
4 Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology, Weill-Bugando University of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza; Pest Management Centre, Sokoine University of Agriculture P.O. Box 3110, Morogoro, Tanzania

Correspondence Address:
Ladslaus L Mnyone
Department of Medical Parasitology and Entomology, Weill-Bugando University of Health Sciences, P.O. Box 1464, Mwanza; Pest Management Centre, Sokoine University of Agriculture P.O. Box 3110, Morogoro
Tanzania

Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of humans being bitten by rabies-suspected animals, and the victims«SQ» adherence to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) regimen. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of data of victims treated at Bugando Medical Centre during the period 2002-2006 (n=5 years) was done. Results: A total of 767 bite injuries inflicted by rabies-suspected animals were reported, giving a mean annual incidence of ~58 cases per 100,000 (52.5% males, 47.5% females). The proportion of children bitten was relatively higher than that of adults. All victims were treated by using inactivated diploid-cell rabies vaccine and were recommended to appear for the second and third doses. However, only 28% of the victims completed the vaccination regime. Domestic dogs were involved in 95.44% of the human bite cases, whereas cats (3.9%), spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) (0.03%), vervet monkey (Cercopithecur aethiops) (0.01%) and black-backed jackal (0.01%) played a minor role. The majority of rabies-suspected case reports were from Nyamagana district and occurred most frequently from June to October each year. Conclusions: In conclusion, this study revealed that incidences of humans being bitten by dogs suspected of rabies are common in Tanzania, involve mostly children, and victims do not comply with the prophylactic regimen. Rigorous surveillance to determine the status of rabies and the risk factors for human rabies, as well as formulation and institution of appropriate rabies-control policies, is required.


How to cite this article:
Mazigo HD, Okumu FO, Kweka EJ, Mnyone LL. Retrospective analysis of suspected rabies cases reported at Bugando Referral Hospital, Mwanza, Tanzania.J Global Infect Dis 2010;2:216-220


How to cite this URL:
Mazigo HD, Okumu FO, Kweka EJ, Mnyone LL. Retrospective analysis of suspected rabies cases reported at Bugando Referral Hospital, Mwanza, Tanzania. J Global Infect Dis [serial online] 2010 [cited 2022 Sep 27 ];2:216-220
Available from: https://www.jgid.org/article.asp?issn=0974-777X;year=2010;volume=2;issue=3;spage=216;epage=220;aulast=Mazigo;type=0